Author Archives: Last Rose

About Last Rose

A late bloomer.

40 Over 40

Article lists 40 first time novelists over the age of 40, up to a few in their 80’s. The 50’s seem most productive in this plucky group. Wonder why? Continue reading

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Late “Boomers” Make 50 the New 30

Huffington Post notes that there is a renaissance in entrepreneurial boomers aged 45 to 70 and give three main reasons for the growing phenomena. Reported in Canada’s Zoomer magazine. Continue reading

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National Novel Writing Month

Okay, late bloomers. It’s now or never! If you are ever seriously going to write that novel burning inside you, take the plunge and sign up for NANOWRIMO. You have one month – November – to produce 50,000 words. There … Continue reading

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The Circuitous Road of Dick King-Smith

After a series of dead end jobs, Dick King-Smith, author of Babe, started writing at age 56 and continued writing up to 10 books a year until his death in January of this year

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Pitch the Publisher – Word on the Street

The Atlantic Publishers Marketing Association invites you to bring your book idea or simply your curiosity to Pitch the Publisher at this year’s Word On The Street Festival on the Halifax Waterfront. Continue reading

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When Do Dreams Die ? A Story of Leo the Late Bloomer

Leo the Late Bloomer is a story to encourage pre-schoolers. Here, Cat’s Eye Writer uses it to springboard into a mature student’s story (her daughter) and encourage late bloomers to never let their dreams die. Continue reading

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Late-Blooming Writers: A Quiz | 317am.net

Late-Blooming Writers: A Quiz | 317am.net 3:17am blogger Ras ponders the question of why today’s young writers, particularly the New Yorker’s select list of 20,  has failed to produce the breakthrough novels of earlier generations.  Listen up, if you’re over … Continue reading

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